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people form and that's when they help out. >> this is the home work. you don't have to write it down it's in the manual. simple things for your home. hazardous conditions in our house. there is a course evaluation in the back of the book. i'm rob [laughter]. >> okay. let's get into the program today is utility control and fire hazard material. we will teaching how to turn your utility's off and what hazardous materials to look for. >> the first thing is natural gas. what do you know about natural gas? flammable. it goes, boom. it's important to shut this off. we use it for cooking, eating and hot water. there were 40,000 people that called pg and e about their gas. that means they call turned off their gas? did they need to do that? when do you have to? when there is a problem. how long did you think it takes pg and e to get out and turn it back on? 45,000 people. days weeks, may be a month. who has seen this in the streets. a lot of muck is in there is it's full of dirt and weeds you turn it to the right to tighten it and left to loosen it. your home work you have to look
we use this. a silly puddy you put on if you have things of value you don't want breaking in an earthquake, grab this. all hardware stores have them. anybody have this at home? >> this is, why is this a hazard aside from it being in an earthquake? most of the home it is built in the city before the 1850's was meant for one socket not for a stereo and everything plugged into it it was meant for one item. hazardous material. this draino and different things, read the labels. it's important to know what you have in the home in case somebody injest it. make sure you know what you have so you don't cross contaminate. you don't want to put bleach next to ammonia. in a disaster if /taeu break and mix, what will happen. you will have a hazardous material place in your house. how about this? the typical garage. most people don't have gas in the suburbs you do. if you have lawn mowers. store it low. gas fumes will creep down to the bottom. if you have to store gas, store it mostly full. if you have an empty gas container -- if you want to protect yourself put cords across it so it
the door with the back of your hand. if it's hot and you don't see smoke, open it slowly, take a look inside, you know if it's a small fire and you can put it out, do it. work in pairs. the second person is your back up. if the fire is too big, close the door and get help. have 2 emergency exits if you can. there is a fire escape there and the stairway we came up, there's your 2 exists. you seen these before? the hose cabinets. there is a fire extinguisher in there, 50 feet of hose. a nozzle and water in there you can turn it on. don't do what he's doing. if you turn this on you will have a pile of spaghetti with hose. one person take the hose out to where you are going to put the fire out. tonight open the door, yet and have the other person turn the water on. if you don't feel comfortable, get out. keep yourself safe. we have gauze. this is made of cotton. what class of fire is that? a. >> we have some fire. we have air. we have heat. we have a fire going. if i went in like that what did i just do? >> smoth erred it. simple; right . remember the hot water heater, we say do
bottles, even if you leave them in a cold environment, you don't know where they've come from or they've been in ship holds which is really hot, just as a number one rule, if you smell something plastic don't drink out of it. >> that's good advice. >> i have two questions, they're a little bit unrelated but the first one goes on the scheme of plastic, so plastic wrap, plastic bags, you know, it's great to say we should all use glass but we know what's used out there is plastic, and it's reusable, you can come up with all these ways to avoid it but there's plastic everywhere and it's accessible and cheap, so plastic wrap gets used a lot, there aren't that many alternatives that can do what plastic wrap does, i don't use a lot of it and it's harder to store things long-term and same question applies for the freezer, it's easier to put things in a freezer bag. >> so, a little tip for that is i do admit to using plastic bags, i reuse them and if something is not -- i don't use them for liquids and if something isn't somehow already kind of like a solid or whatever, parchment paper around
will be putting out a fire with a fire extinguisher. you don't want to learn out to house an extinguisher when they big fire is in front of you. when you turn off your natural gas and water. hazardous materials will be talked about next week. 35-40 percent of you. you will find out that all of you have hazardous material in your home. the third week is disaster medicine. you, going into a room spending 45 seconds on one person into 3 life saving techniques. by the fourth we we will teach you as search and rescuers how to keep yourself safe by identifying safe and none safe building to go into. sometimes objects are too heavy for you to liftoff of a body. we will teach you privying which will use anything you have, wood or cement blocks so you is see that people can lift heavy objects off of people. now, you have to have a plan. every program needs to have a plan. we can't say, here are your skills. class 6, after half an hour we will split you into teams of 10 people each. putting out the fires. you will go into a dark room and doing a search. you will be treating people with injuries on them.
, i just wanted to cringe. >> what's clear is when dad said if you don't make a stop, this could happen to your little sister. then the sister gets in on it and it's, like, just puts the, as sisters will do, but i think as a, as someone who was a boy and had difficult conversations with my dad, i really really remember that sort of punch them, make it go away. a lot of families will give that advice. i'm not even convinced that's the wrong advice, the problem is when they doesn't work, then they shut down and quit coming to you because they are afraid it's a double disappointment. they can't please their peers and find friendship and then they so don't want to lose their fathers as well, this boy-father thing is so deep. >> every single person in this room wants to start making a difference. we want to start doing it right now. ros, how do you start giving a child the dignity that was taken away? >> i'm actually going to use an example that might seem a little far-flung for that question. one of the things i wanted to talk about with colleagues is the write up process when
the conversation started to flow and not only did people connect to how they missed those moments and that they don't, that they felt they didn't have the training to catch those moments or really do that inner reflection, but then they started sharing their stories of being bullied in their life and why they got into education and suddenly everyone was crying. it's a really amazing moment. so i think those moments are really important. the other thing you asked about with the parent when sunset is referring to alex's dad. >> they are referring to his mom and dad being upset with him for not standing up for himself, i just wanted to cringe. >> what's clear is when dad said if you don't make a stop, this could happen to your little sister. then the sister gets in on it and it's, like, just puts the, as sisters will do, but i think as a, as someone who was a boy and had difficult conversations with my dad, i really really remember that sort of punch them, make it go away. a lot of families will give that advice. i'm not even convinced that's the wrong advice, the problem is when they doesn't work
this blame the new thing that's come along because we don't fully understand it because we kind of don't like it, or it's a waste of time for kids and all of those things are understandable and we blame what we don't understand, but kids love the media and it's time to start the understanding and understanding that these media are totally blended into their lives. it's not an alternate reality or something separate or add on that the school and the school context is what we're really talking about here and that is 90% of their waking hours. that's their social life. >> and one of the reasons that a lot of researchers and nonprofits don't like the term "cyber bull" and it's about the technology but not the behavior itself. we don't actually use the world cyber bullying. we talk about the behavior and there is tons of research we're doing in how people are behaving on our platform and the tools we can give them to resolve their issues and either through themselves and trusted audiences, et cetera, or turn to us and we don't use the term "cyber bullying" and we don't think ab
point of view? >> i don't know how we could retroacactively review a form six application now. number one, it wouldn't be necessary because we don't have evidence that this was one building. we have evidence to the contrary that it was in addition to an existing building. >> okay. >> so if i could follow up on that. my question -- i don't know if it's to you or the city attorney what are the political implications would be of upholding the appeal. you just said you don't believe the department can issue a different permit. >> i don't believe so because the information that we have and we have recovered from our records indicate what was demolished to be an addition to what was already there. >> so if we were to uphold the appeal what are the politicsal consequences if any? >> >> and more what other options do we have besides the appeal? city attorney? >> well, i think you just said that. i mean -- i think the gentleman just responded to your question. if you up hold the appeal then you revoke the permit and they have to apply for another permit and what permit is proper under the
an important distinction that we need to make. we don't want to send the message to america that bullying is normative; that bullying is normal, and that clip illustrated that the school is sending that message, and there is a difference, an important distinction between the school sort of embodying and sending the message to the kids that bullying is just a part of growing up and believing that bullying in our school is normative because it simply isn't. the data shows bullying is going down and that is not a popular thing to say these days. bullying is a very important social problem that we need to fix, but it is not an epidemic and it's not on the rise and neither is cyber bullying and the top scholars in the country and in social science and psychology that saying that, so that's an important distinction so thank you both so much. >> and there is that and -- there's a balance between -- i mean when i hear that bullying is going down i mean all of us should rejoice because that to me is indicative of the fact of the work in communities across the country are starting to pay off, but
where you could say "hey, i don't like that piece of content" and instead of reporting to facebook ink and we have 3,000 people but we don't understand the context of everything going on. you can report to a family or friend or somebody off the site. >> in the context -- >> in the context of the behavior itself. we have seen the reports go down. the closing of the reports go up and when we surveyed the people both the person reported and the person reporting -- not everyone, but most of the people were very satisfied how it resolved itself. now just think about that. somebody said -- so it's like i say to anne "anne nice shirt. nice jacket. >> but you hate it. >> and i hate it or maybe i don't. i'm giving a complement. the thing is facebook inc. doesn't know the context but now we have a system in place and i can resolve to anne and anne could say "i didn't mean to post that photo in an inappropriate way. i'm going to take it down" and we survey the people and everyone feels good about the situation and traditionally we thought it was a case of bullying and two people -- >> mis
to go that way. okay, you want to go my way. 1, 2, 3. >> okay, why don't you stop. >> 1, 2, 3. >> make sure your back is straight. >> basically when you are using a ladder out there, make sure you keep the ladder 10 feet away from wires. make sure the ladder is secure, that it's on stable ground, that it's even. if it's on a hill, we really don't want you to use it on a hill, but if it's on a hill, make sure it's shimmieed with something stable. make sure it's at the right angle, we suggest 70 degrees. if you stick your hand on a rung, the angle of the ladder is about the right angle there. never let go of the ladder. stand in the center, climb straight up. if you climb on the edges of the rung, the ladder will go this way. look up so you know where you are going and you can see where you're going to climb. walk vertically. don't step off to the side of the ladder. kind of common sense. make sure you read chapter 7 through the . >> this class is managing a disaster. what happens and how do we fit in? emergency operation plan, everything is going to go through the mayor. you have the of
the opportunity. now, again, back to the politics. being a heavily kurdish region, they don't have the greatest relationship with istanbul, they don't have the greatest relationship with the turkish government. it's a completely different world. it's completely opposite. when their armed forces show up, it's not really lacked upon as a good thin. this is why i want to say thank you to our military that's here today, to the army, the navy, the military in general, the marines, the coast guard, even i saw a couple air force running around here yesterday. the fact that you are here and you are in san francisco and you do this every year, it says a lot. because we lack at -- look at this as a good week. we have a great working relationship and after being there and seeing that it's not a good relationship and people get really, really tense when the guys in green show up, it makes me appreciate what we have all the more. there's one other thing i really appreciate, by the way, and i'll direct this to general speese being the trainer that he is, i got a whole new appreciation for muzzle discipli
so that we don't have false evidence that is introduced or undue reliance on science that isn't quite there yet. my preference is recognize it's already there, but make sure that we have robust discussions about the validity of the science before people buy into it too much. >> yeah, i would just add that i basically agree that it's already in the courtroom. however, i would caution that it's not in the courtroom for all uses. justice breyer in a case which was the third of the trilogy which is basically the supreme court weighing in on the admissibility of scientific evidence or expert evidence more generally, justice breyer referred to making sure that the science works for the task at hand. this notion of the task at hand i think ought not to be forgotten. the neuroscience might work for certain tasks very well and for other tasks not so well. so i think we have to evaluate it on a case-by-case basis. i very much agree with anita's point that a lot of the neuroscience right now works quite well at the group level and has not yet been shown to work particularly well at the individua
this and don't tell the young people how to never go to a place like this, you're still a thief. i owe people. that's why i go to talk to people. but my disease is first off wrong, theirs guaranteed wrong. made that way was i. first thought wrong, inappropriate, impolite, incorrect, cruel, criminal, abusive, petty, angry, poor, first thought wrong, absolutely. first thought wrong. 12 minutes, that's what i get? 12? second thought was i'll take two and make a difference. first thought wrong, sometimes second thought wrong grr! sometimes it takes me 15 minutes to get to a healthy thought. sometimes longer. sometimes four days of long, wrong, and strong. i went through t.s.a. recently in san jose where i live. i was born and raised in oakland, i went to jail in livermore. here is the part. normal people don't laugh at jail there. i worked there. god bless you if you worked there. i couldn't do that job for two days in a row. i can do it for an hour. an ex-felon who is an extraordinary father. i can become an ex-drunk who is an exceptional citizen. there is a transition necessary for a convicted,
he gets to that stage and sounds like this might be not anticipated and i don't think it's something he would go out to do. he feels he needs the permission to go to the expense of getting everything else paid for charged out. >> mr. crawford. >> thank you commissioner. if i could remind the commission also the project does not involve an expansion of the building in any way. >> thank you. >> commissioner sugaya. >> yes. i don't know if this is true or not, but with five commissioners you may not have enough votes to pass this at this session. >> dr. >> whatever. >> so i'm going to propose a continuance. >> second. >> why with five commissioners we are not able to -- >> right now you only have four and i don't know how they're going to vote. >> [inaudible] >> we have five. >> i'm saying you have five commissioners but four votes. >> you're assuming by making that assumption that we're not -- (inaudible). >> yes, i am. we've done this in the past -- >> you could test the motion and then continue. >> you have to at least test it. >> you don't have to but request for continuance su
. if the peer leader doesn't do the right thing -- and this is my initiative and if you don't do the right thing you don't look like what know what you're doing and that isn't cool and you didn't do your job that well, if we get in these ambassador programs and give them training and rigor and how difficult that moment can be you can transform a school because of the power of kids talking to each other. >> all right. do we have another question? >> i appreciate that point you have been making. been, wooing with the board and the foundation and launch the student advisory board and i think we need to get that training kicked in really fast and that's a point well taken, and i appreciate lee you showing that clip because it illustrates an important distinction that we need to make. we don't want to send the message to america that bullying is normative; that bullying is normal, and that clip illustrated that the school is sending that message, and there is a difference, an important distinction between the school sort of embodying and sending the message to the kids that bullying is just a part
. you have heard from neighbors, friends, co-workers. i don't want to put it this way but i believe here in bay view we receive short shift. i believe that this permit was a plied for fraud lantly, knowingly, intelgzly disguising the fact it's a full demolition calling it instead an alteration. when you tear down two thirds of the square footage on the site when it's a fly by night operation. when there are no dust controls, no traffic controls, no thought about the health and safety of the residents. i find that problematic and i heard someone say "only in the bay view". i am tiredded of coming to city hall and fighting for my neighborhood. i lived in san francisco for many years. i lived in various zip codes in the area. why is it in this area we have to come in and beg for basic services, basic attention to the requirements of the law? i ask you under what definition is this type of demolition regarded as an alteration? it doesn't make sense to me, and i believe the safety, the health and safety of our residents, our children, as we live, work, breathe, eat, sleep in th
much. >> i have a question. you were slated to start construction december 1 but apparently you don't have the appropriate permits? >> can i get mr. lows? that's out of my expertise. that's my understanding. maybe i misunderstood. >> it was a long time -- at that time - - [inaudible] now i have more white hair than you. when we first get our site permit in november we can push for the addendum as fast as possible, but when the permit put there so we hold everything off. we have the addendum plan already. we scheduled meetings with the plan checker. we might not be done by december 1 but partially permit and the foundation and different work. in his mind that was starting construction. >> mr. wall, you indicated that the permits hasn't changed based upon the building department -- i'm sorry mr. wall. mr. sires, you know when i looked over that form i'm not sure it shows it never changed, but let me ask you the question. has your design change from what you presented at the 09-11? >> if you look at exhibit number five -- i'm sorry eight. it's the permit details report and i
they send their testing out to a separate lab. they don't carry their own lab and i prefer not to specify a specific. >> and commissioners to be clear then the suspension on this permit is not lifted until the soil testing results have been submitted. >> correct. >> okay. >> okay. so we're not specifying any lab per se, and who are the recipients again of the results? >> the paltant and the department of building inspection. >> very good. conduct on site and certified lab with results provided to appellants and the department of building inspection. notice to end in five years and the suspension -- the board's suspension of this permit shall be lifted when the results are given to the appellants and the department of building inspection. >> correct. >> okay. so we will get notice from then and then we can release further paperwork at this point. >> [inaudible] >> please don't speak from the audience. >> i apologize. are you saying it's regardless of the outcome? >> we heard the question. let us deal with that. i understand what you're doing. no. i think if there are toxics in the
generally they don't like it when other people are taken advantage of. it really offends the very core for a prosecutor. you know i often joke i don't even like when people cut in line but i recognize there is not necessarily a remedy to that, but so bullying is something that almost everybody has had an experience in their life of being bullied, and i think one perspective as prosecutors is if we don't address this today's bullies -- and if we don't address it are tomorrow's batters, and today's victims of bullying becomes tomorrow's victims. that is painting with a very broad brush, but it's something that encourages us to take action. i think in my prosecutors office there is hard and soft power. the hard power in a prosecutor's office, in a police department, it's arresting. it's putting in jail. it's going in court and find this person guilty and punish them. that's a kind of hard power and most of what is done in a prosecutor's office -- most of the resources are devoted to those hard power tasks, but although we devote less resources to soft power there are probably more imp
, and if they don't know how to put words to that, they don't know how to begin to solve the problems or ask for help and this is at the very fundamental level which we teach very, very young children. they have the do -- domains and compassion and we heard bullying is a problem with relationships and a lot of researchers talk about it like this as well. this is where we learn about having positive relationships that make a difference between peer to peer in the schools that make a difference between adults and the children in the schools and for people not just in school but i am sure all of you can look up here and in each of the domains think of something in all of them in the last 24 hours that you had to use, that you had to activate in relationships with the co-workers or spouses and these are different life skills and there is the area of responsible decision making and comes into play when you have to figure out what to do when you have a problem, so you can probably just look at that and "oh yes, i see where the connections would be" and i would like to kind of point out because w
with school resource officers and how to work with students. we don't believe we should even call anyone a bully because once you get labeled it stays with you. i've gotten letters saying there's a bully in my kid's first grade. the statistics show that about a third of the kids are bullied and bully others. as one kid said, i wanted to man up and show i wasn't going to be bullied so i did it to anyone else. breaking that cycle is going to be exciting and it's exciting to hear that restoretive justice isn't just on the fringe, that whole school districts are taking them on. it's going to be a process to do that because part of the anti-bullying movement is you go online, you see stomp out the bully, get the bully. it's important we all kind of take a stand on that. we all need to learn how to treat each other and change our behaviors. >> thanks, becky, unfortunately that is in in terms of questions because i hate to be the person to stand between you and lunch. we will take about a 20-minute break, you should all be back in your seats by about 12.20, if you can all join me in thanki
number that would be nice. who is the safety person? we don't want to send people out, just hey, go do this. we want to keep track of it. if they don't come back within a couple hours we have to send somebody to find them or at least checkup on them. if we don't know where they went and who they are, you have chaos. they might be hurt and they're going to stay hurt. we're going to roll on to disaster psychology. what does that mean? when people go through a disaster, their lives are wrecked. i saw this firsthand, i went down to help out with katrina thing in september. it's weird. because you are dealing with people that lost everything and it's kind of hard to imagine that if you haven't done it yourself. basically, you know, she's looking at her curtains here, she probably hand-stitched those things. maybe they have been hanging there the last 5 or 6 years. everything in the house is wrecked, photos, keepsakes, it's a tough thing. and people deal with this kind of stress in different ways. we as disaster workers, we see it all the time. but we have a word we use, professional. we try
at that microphone right there. if you're coming up -- no, he did youant [speaker not understood]. >> i don't have a question. i wanted to comment on this. i think something else is really unique and maybe one of the untold stories or not told so much stories about the impact of open data is really the companies that are being formed. and as you mentioned earlier, they're a sustainable company and this is being powered by open data and motion loft is figuring out how they can share the asset that sort of your business model is built on. so, i think that this is presenting a whole new type of question for sort of apps built with government data or public data. >> i guess i'll jump in once here, too, while people are stepping up. we've been doing this for awhile now. one thing we've learned in this innovation space, people matter. like you can build technology you want, platform you want, that's great. it's the people who are doing it that matter and they're going to get stuff done. this has some of the best people, shannon and jay are doing t. they've been doing it awhile so they know what they're
no matter where they live? that put a lot of pressure on them because the consumers said we don't want those things in our products and the change happened and now they have a plan with timelines and clear transparent goals to get those chemicals out of their products. it might be a little slower than we'd all like as consumers but it's moving in the right direction and getting one major company to move put a lot of pressure on those other companies if they want to maintain their credibility, so we're seeing safer shampoo products, we want to pass laws. >> radiation is the longest and best studied exposure link to breast cancer and what can we do about that, some radiation is naturally occurring, but we know that since 1980, radiation exposures for the average person have doubled and most of that is probably due to a 600 % increase in medical radiation, we're being exposed to a lot more radiation from medical tests, sometimes that's the only option, it's worth that added risk because the alternative is really dangerous sometimes, but we want to ensure those scans and those medical imaging te
the risk, you don't have 40 years left in your life span at that point perhaps, you have 30, you're at a less vulnerable stage of life so there are a lot more benefits for life, your breast cancer risks are higher, so you know, the age 40 to 50, there's still a lot of debate about that and women need to discuss this with their own health care providers, but recent research has found that women who are at high risk of breast cancer because of braque of mutation who then screening at earlier and earlier ages may be particularly vulnerable to radiation, so for them, alternatives to radiation based screening need to be, you know, used either in lieu of or in addition to and that's a very personal decision and a medical decision, but that added risk for those women who are already at higher risk from the very -- the detect is a really important issue, so does that answer your question? >> [inaudible]. >> awesome, okay, so schools, i've talked about some changes that can happen at schools but the reason we wanted to highlight this is because we can talk about federal laws, about state
mcpeek wrote in the chronicle and the letters, i don't know if you've read them -- you should pick up -- the letters that a couple of, you know, irish americans wrote in response accusing cousin mcpeek of not having a sense of humor. it has to do with these tee shirts that target has produced for the st. patrick's day parade in which mrs. mcpeek derided the fact that they were making fun of the irish in the united states, you know, things like i survived the kelly murphy family gathering, things like that. and they wrote letters poking fun at what i thought was a couragous op ed piece. so this is in response to the irish americans who don't feel the pride that they should. and please excuse if i manhandle the irish manner of speaking. this is a joke told to me by one of my friends. he said that an american, an irish american, was golfing with his wife on a weekend. and he hit the ball into the rough. went looking for it. all of a sudden, a leprechaun jumped up. we're back to the leprechaun theme. he said, top of the morning to you, lad. he says, you're a leprechaun. he says, yes, i am
, but there are so many that just do -- that don't do anything behind the walls, which is an issue for us, that when we go when their -- people buy it, but we have to really make sure the homeowner is aware of both. >> something else that is a typical misnomer, i think, remodeling my house, doing a quick renovations before i sell it or try to market it might increase its value. not necessarily always, and not necessarily in all instances. one thing that -- you know, there are different levels of that. it is so important to get professional opinions about your true goals to see if your goals for doing a major improvement for a minor improvement on your property, if those goals line up with the market situation, and how best to reach those goals. maybe there are ways to reach those goals for you, in a personal way that may not involve the heavier remodel. >> let me mention a couple of things. people are coming in to replace a profound asians and to other work that they believe is necessary -- profound foundations and do other work that they believe is necessary. they do things they think should be don
and a half years ago. we don't know what is going on in between. he's has an explanation. he talks about rule 311 and notification and not have an exprireration date and in the notes that's definitely referred opposite to that, and i think that this board in its wisdom might consider taking the application and put it on hold until it's properly investigated. i am very much concerned that our house is adjoin one another. i know nothing about his foundation plans. i know he took advantage the planning codes and built to the absolute maximum and under certain review the project would not be what it is today. it's phrased in terms of developing a two car garage which everyone is in favor of. that takes another car or two off the street but that's not the purpose of this thing. it's adding extensive amount of square footage and affect the property owners who are here to tell you their thing. i would like to call upon our architect to respond to the technical aspects of the process because that's not my role. thank you. >> good evening. i am the principal of fractured nine. we are a sma
, especially for kids are a lot of times, they don't know how to scale down for a child-size body and the machines may not calibrate or have clear directions on how to make that happen so in our own lives, we can ask our health care provides, are there safer alternative, mri or ultrasounds for doing this test, and then if you have kids and they need a test, ensure and ask questions about the safest dose and if they have machines that can calibrate to kids, and then we have to see these changes with the laws so if fda has proposals out for medical imaging around kids so you know how to downsize a radiation dose for kids who is smaller, their physical size is narrower, and also to make machines more accountable and more clear in how they work. >> [inaudible]. >> it's very low doses but that's an excellent question and i thought somebody would probably ask that. so, the united states preventative services task force in 2009 came out with a proposal to revise guidelines saying that perhaps women aged 40 to 50, there's no cost benefit really for that age group in terms of having mammog
to answer them. what i had done is i usual low don't work with an out line. a lot of writers do they will out line what will happen and sometimes they have to because like if you are writing a mystery you need to write out the plot. i write about characters the characters drive the story. when that hatched i sat down and said, what happens is, a, he arrived and gets off the train what's going to happen. >> i know z, he would get on the train and leave at the evented book. i didn't know the alphabet in between. i was nervous and i took one step at a time very japanese like. i began to study and read everything i could find on the japanese culture. the incredible thing was not having everything that went into it and it still became a quiet book. there is a tsunami. there's tv and lep easier and a fire. i call it my zen book i think it's because as i was learning about the japanese culture, all of that started to go into the book. and it gave me the structure of what the book would become, which was very much taking after what a japanese garden it. early on a read about gardens. y
that most other places don't. the geometry and geography of san francisco is up that it is easier for us being in a city of short trips to veil ourselves to other alternatives to the car. so when we want to reclaim the street and the public right-of-way and the public realm for people and basic human needs of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our
calendar. is there a -- i think there are some comments on the consend calendar and i don't know -- i understand the item commissioner courtney is going to move. >> shall we begin? >> i'll recognize him to do that. >> yeah, i'd like to make a request that we remove from the agenda item 9h, pending approval of a modification. and there are copies for the public if anyone is interested. >> i don't want to remove any other items. i know dr. jackson wanted to make a comment on item 9a. is that correct? >>> yes. >> why don't we make the comment while we're considering the consent item as a whole rather than removing an item. >> does it need to be read into the record? i'll read the item. consent calendar item 9, 9a through 9j consent -- >> go ahead. >> all matter listed hereunder constitute a consent calendar, are considered to be routine by the san francisco public utilities commission, and will be acted upon by a single vote of the commission. there will be no separate discussion of these items unless a member of the commission or the public so requests, in which event the matter will be
over, just fyi. superintendent. >> don't start the clock yet. thanks. again i want to thank everyone for being here this morning and this morning i said "welcome to a sunny day in september" and many of you didn't believe me and i want to thank you all for being here and in my comments at the beginning i spoke of the wonderful experience and having 3,000 opportunities yesterday see "bully" the movie. i spoke of all of the administrators seeing "bully" when they came back from summer break and develop their plans on their campuses here, so i would like to go deeper and talk about a couple of things and before that i appreciate what rosylyn and the previous panel said about the term "bullying" and run the risk of it meaning something generic and meaningless and the word of the day, so let's talk about what it is. it's assault. sometimes it's aggravated assault. it's kidnapping. it's coercion of human rights. it's stalking. these are different pictures when you think about it in those terms. that's what bullying is so in san francisco unified we say we have a zero tolerance fo
, peace. [applause]. >> flying inside the evening sky. i don't know the name of the blues that shadow our past. one is sweet and light a cool meringue. another sharp but still. a third thick presses down upon the rest. colbolt. a blue that hums deeply a harmony of ferm ment denying stars shining inside the cosmos. forever blue where life dies and is reborn. an eternal blue that exists above the storm. a blue that doesn't suffer discord that would smile if it had a mouth. embrace if it was armed. comfort if it grew heart. instead it arcs a concert of blues hovering over the earth in an endless ocean of impossible quiet. thick with blue beyond blue. a blue that disappears when clutched in the fist, a blue invisible and solid. thank you very much. [applause] >> please, welcome camill. >> that was a great reading and you changed up my play list. >> start with a poem i read after i learned that the rate of valum prescriptions in baghdad sky rocketed after the u.s. entry into that space. the title of the poem and it is the words the probably roost which is bitter. biting, cutting, sharp. bit
it but i don't know if mopping down is what 9 does, i don't know if this is company policy because i haven't been there. it is? okay. >> i have a question. my question is unrelated, talking about -- going back to the radiation and how bad it is for your body, so why do they recommend it as a treatment if someone has had cancer of various sorts? >> kind of because it can be toxic to cells and -- so, if you target it, right, and then you're directing it to those very cancer cells that are growing very rapidly and are in a very focal area, then you are, you know, -- and it's at a higher dose than you're exposed to when you're screening, you're killing those cells and you're stopping their growth, so they're leveraging that particular feature of the radiation just as they do with chemotherapy which is drugs that we won't have to take unless we're needing to kill those cancer cells. >> [inaudible] radiation? >> it is very focused >> even though the [inaudible] i was talking about, if it's focused, why does everybody leave the room? >> they're spending their 8 hour work day, and even if it's foc
practices. they're committed to the business. they don't look at ht as a commodity. they all have an interest, a value added. and when you combine all that, you will have the best product out there. >> i'm prgud to be a mariana grower because it @ives what you do a good feeling. i mean, you wake up in the morning and, like, "i can do this and grow a good crop and provide it to the area and put it out there in a nice pack." and... makes you feel good. >> so, another member of the family, natalie, here. now, natalie, what do you do for the company? what's your job? >> i have been fortunate enough--i worked in the company a little bit before i had my child, my son. and then i got to come back and be a spokesperson-- >> oh, good. ok. >> and share delicious recipes and do a little bit of online things for them. so... >> that's great. 'cause i think people think of dried fruit, and they think of maybe, oh, just trail mix or snacking. but i mean, look at all this stuff we have here. this is amazing. >> exactly. and i think that's what we really want to communicate to our customers-- that
's not a catastrophic issue, we don't think much about it. but there is a 10%, 20%, 30% water loss or leakage in some systems. allbee: already treated water that you've invested money in, you're losing before you actually delivered it. narrator: so many utilities are employing the business strategy of asset management. it's a paradigm shift in the approach of attaining a sustainable water infrastructure. man: it's not construction of new pipelines. we are talking about maintaining, sustaining the infrastructure we have. you've got to know what you have, where it is, what condition it's in, and how long you can expect it to last. melosi: we have very little choice because we've invested in a system that cannot be readily changed. we don't leave a lot of flexibility to dig that all up and replace it with something else. sinha: so we have to also teach our students, the workforce, that there is a new science -- repair, renewal, and rehabilitation. that's different from building something new. you cannot fix each and every crack in the city. it's like each city, you're talking about 3,000, 5,000 miles of
be significant especially in a city like san francisco when maybe you don't have a lot of roof space, but you want to get as much power as you can. this is probably the choice preferred for most homeowners. the second technology which is coming on strong is called thin film. that's really a whole different technology using a lot less material. it's like sprayed or painted on, a different way of producing electricity. this stuff has a lot of potential because it can be used in a lot of different ways. this is a thin film panel here, right here and one of the innovative ways you can use this thing is on thought metal seamed roofs. they have an add he'sive backing on and they can stick down on the roof without penetrating the roof. it's a very effective and cheap and safe installation process. thin film has a smaller, a lesser efficiency. half as efficient but it's about half the cost. so if you look at it, a small system 1.2 kilowatt systems, it produces 1.2 kill what's in full sun or 1,200 watts. in crystal lynn it could would take 500 panels. in thin film it would take this much space. they w
they are capable of doing it when other people don't believe in them. they see the passion of that teacher, the willingness to care. but that discipline to say, i will not let you fail. and you will do the work to make it happen. and that's what students said about michelle. i would like to read you a brief comment that summarizes several comments of the students that nominated her. mrs. kyung is an amazing teacher. she loves the subject and made us better. she told interesting stories about history. she was organized and well prepared and never a minute wasted in class. her energy made the class interesting and fun. she encouraged us to express our thoughts and beliefs without judging us. she forced us to form our own beliefs. to required us to express how and why we formed our conclusions. and taught us to think, her influence had dramatic and lasting influence in my life. that summarizes what seven or eight students said about michelle. when we finally decide on the 15 teach teache teachers, i watch them teach and the board decides on five. and we give each of those an 5,000 did, and an
. hard to see. also has a parapet on it. deep set windows. even though it has stucco on it, don't be fooled that that's wood up above. it's all brick because it's deep set windows. here we go with part of the roof and the parapet. this is over on (inaudible) street. see where the bricks fell, right on top of a car. there were 5 people in that car. buildings like this, you are nearest, where's the best place to be, do you think? you want to be far away from it? you want to be far away from it initially? yeah. but what if you are not far away from it when it starts happening, are you going to try to outrun it? no. you want to get up close to that building because the bricks have a tendency to fall out, fall straight down. if you'll notice right up next to the building there's not that many bricks. tilt up buildings, premade buildings. they are made on the site. generally speaking, you see warehouses, large expanse buildings are made out of them, usually one story buildings. in other words there's not a story on top. they didn't make their corner connections very well. when they di
and don't forget the air way, breathing, and shock and whatever you do know your limit and what you are capabilit capa once you are involved with the nert teams and you get to revie the stuff and what you can do and physically you know what yo can do and lift people and mentally is another thing and w will talk about disaster psychology next week and some people say they can't look at blood or some say they can't look at a child screaming and know your limits and don't become a victim yourself. . >> we're going to go over search and rescue in this class, go over some buildings and how you assess buildings. you already had classes on utility controls, correct? how about medical? did medical? okay, as i said, my name is alec, i'm on truck 11. let's go into some light search and rescue. before you start, what do you do? stop, look, listen and think. any time you pull up to an incident or you see something, you take a breath, assess the situation, use all your senses and think about what you are going to do. those are all components of what we call the size-up. there are many components
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